Anne Longfellow1

F, b. 3 October 1683, d. 24 February 1758
     Anne Longfellow was born on 3 October 1683.2 She was the daughter of Ensign William Longfellow and Anne Sewall.1 Anne Longfellow married Captain Abraham Adams, son of Sgt. Abraham Adams and Mary Pettingill, in December 1703.2 Anne Longfellow died on 24 February 1758 in Byfield at the age of 74.

Child of Anne Longfellow and Captain Abraham Adams

Citations

  1. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 231.
  2. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), p. 1083.
  3. [S75] Frederick Lewis Weis, Colonial Clergy, p. 17.

Annie Allegra Longfellow1,2

F, b. 8 November 1855, d. 28 February 1934
     Annie Allegra Longfellow was born on 8 November 1855 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.3 She was the daughter of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Frances Elizabeth Appleton.1 Annie Allegra Longfellow married Joseph Gilbert Thorp, son of Joseph Gilbert Thorp and Susan Amelia Chapman, on 14 October 1885 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, at the time of his marriage he was "of Eau Claire, Wis."4 Annie Allegra Longfellow died on 28 February 1934 in Cambridge at the age of 78.3

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 7, p. 11.
  2. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 235.
  3. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 88 p. 295.
  4. [S205] Newspaper, The Congregationalist, (Boston, MA) Thursday, October 22, 1885.
  5. [S83] NEHGR, Vol. 88 p. 296.

Benjamin Longfellow1

M, b. 4 April 1761
     Benjamin Longfellow was born on 4 April 1761 he went to sea and was never heard of again.1 He was the son of William Longfellow and Hepsibah Plummer.1

Citations

  1. [S193] Anon, Genealogy of the Longfellow family, p. 7.

Charles Appleton Longfellow1

M, b. 9 June 1844, d. 13 April 1893
     Charles Appleton Longfellow was born on 9 June 1844 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.2 He was the son of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Frances Elizabeth Appleton.3 Charles Appleton Longfellow enlisted in the National Service and was badly wounded at Mine Run in 1861.3 He was a lieutenant in the 1st Massachusetts Cavalry during the civil war.1 He died on 13 April 1893 in Cambridge at the age of 482 and is buried in Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Massachusetts.2

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 7, p. 11.
  2. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 13400999."
  3. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.

David Longfellow1

M, b. 31 August 1787, d. 11 August 1791
     David Longfellow was born on 31 August 1787.1 He was the son of Nathan Longfellow and Taphenes Huntly.1 David Longfellow died on 11 August 1791 at the age of 3.1

Citations

  1. [S193] Anon, Genealogy of the Longfellow family, p. 7.

Edith Longfellow1

F, b. 22 October 1853, d. 21 July 1915
     Edith Longfellow was born on 22 October 1853.2 She was the daughter of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Frances Elizabeth Appleton.1 Edith Longfellow married Richard Henry Dana on 10 January 1878 in Boston, Massachusetts.3 Edith Longfellow died on 21 July 1915 at the age of 612 and is buried in Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Massachusetts.2

Citations

  1. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 7, p. 11.
  2. [S392] Website findagrave.com (http://www.findagrave.com/) "# 53283890."
  3. [S232] Ancestry.com, Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988.

Edward Longfellow1

M
     Edward Longfellow was living in Yorkshire.1

Child of Edward Longfellow

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.

Edward Longfellow1

M, b. 29 April 1718, d. 22 August 1794
     Edward Longfellow was born on 29 April 1718.2 He was the son of Lt. Stephen Longfellow and Abigail Thompson.1 Edward Longfellow died on 22 August 1794 at the age of 76.2

Citations

  1. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 231.
  2. [S193] Anon, Genealogy of the Longfellow family, p. 5.

Elizabeth Longfellow1,2

F, d. 1829
     Elizabeth Longfellow was the daughter of Hon. Stephen Longfellow and Zilpah Wadsworth.1 Elizabeth Longfellow died in 1829.2

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 7, p. 11.

Elizabeth Longfellow1

F, b. 3 July 1688
     Elizabeth Longfellow was born on 3 July 1688.2 She was the daughter of Ensign William Longfellow and Anne Sewall.1 Elizabeth Longfellow married Benjamin Woodman, son of Joshua Woodman and Elizabeth Stevens, in 1711.3

Child of Elizabeth Longfellow and Benjamin Woodman

Citations

  1. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 231.
  2. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), p. 1083.
  3. [S193] Anon, Genealogy of the Longfellow family, p. 4.
  4. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 6 p. 474.

Elizabeth Longfellow1

F, b. 18 August 1732, d. 25 August 1732
     Elizabeth Longfellow was born on 18 August 1732.2 She was the daughter of Lt. Stephen Longfellow and Abigail Thompson.1 Elizabeth Longfellow died on 25 August 1732.2

Citations

  1. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 231.
  2. [S193] Anon, Genealogy of the Longfellow family, p. 6.

Ellen Longfellow1

F
     Ellen Longfellow was the daughter of Hon. Stephen Longfellow and Zilpah Wadsworth.1 Ellen Longfellow died young.1

Citations

  1. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 234.

Ernest Wadsworth Longfellow1

M, b. 23 November 1845
     Ernest Wadsworth Longfellow was born on 23 November 1845 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.2 He was the son of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Frances Elizabeth Appleton.1 He was a artist.2 Ernest Wadsworth Longfellow married Harriet E. Spelman, daughter of Israel Monson Spelman, in 1868.2 His preparatory education was acquired in private schools in Cambridge and Boston, and he was graduated from Lawrence Scientific school, Harvard, S.B., 1865. He studied art in Paris under Hèbert, and after visiting Italy and Germany he returned to America in 1866. After his marriage in 1868 he again went abroad, studying under Bonnat in Paris, 1868-69. On his return in 1869 he opened a studio in Boston. He exhibited "The Old Mill" at the Centennial exhibition, Philadelphia, 1876; studied under Goutare near Paris, 1876-77, returning to America in 1879. He was vice-president of the Boston Art club, 1880-82, and was later elected a member of the Century Association. His earlier works include: Italian Phiferari (1877); Choice of Youth (1878); Evening on the Nile (1880); Morning on the Ægean (1881), and three portraits of Henry W. Longfellow: 1, at Craigie House (1876); 2, at Bowdoin college (1881); 3, finished after the poet's death. His later works consist chiefly of small landscapes and ideal nude subjects.2

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  2. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 7, p. 11.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow1

M, b. 27 February 1807, d. 24 March 1882
     Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. The Poet. He was born on 27 February 1807 in Fore Street, Portland, Maine, (1809 according to Titcomb.)2 He was the son of Hon. Stephen Longfellow and Zilpah Wadsworth.1 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was educated in 1821 at Bowdoin College from Portland Academy with his brother Stephen.3 He graduated in 1825 from Bowdoin.3 He married Mary Storer Potter, daughter of Judge Barrett Potter and Anne Storer, on 14 September 1831.4 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow married Frances Elizabeth Appleton, daughter of Nathan Appleton and Maria Theresa Gold, on 13 July 1848.5 He was named for his maternal uncle, a lieutenant in the American navy, who when nineteen years of age perished gallantly at Tripoli in the fire-ship Intrepid. He spent his boyhood on Congress street, Portland, his mother's ancestral home, and began his school life at the age of three, attending a school kept by Mrs. Fellows. He entered a public school in Love Lane, Portland, in 1812, where he remained for a week, when he was removed by his parents to a private school kept by Mr. Wright and later by Mr. N.H. Cartar. After attending Portland academy, 1812-21, he entered Bowdoin college and during his course there contributed occasional poems to periodicals, his first printed verses, "The Battle of Lovell's Pond," appearing in the Portland Gazette of Nov. 17, 1820. At the senior examination he made a translation from Horace which was warmly approved by one of the college trustees, Mr. Benjamin Kerr?, who recommended young Longfellow for a proposed chair of modern languages. The trustees provisionally approved the proposal, stipulating that Longfellow fit himself for the position in Europe. Accordingly after spending the winter of 1825-26 in rest at his portland home, reading a little in his father's law office, on May 15, 1826, he sailed for Havre-de-Grâce. He studied and traveled in France, Spain, Germany, Italy and England, and returned home in July, 1829, on receiving the news of the death of his sister Elizabeth. On the opening of the term at Bowdoin college in 1829, instead of the expected professorship he was offered the position of instructor, which he rejected. At a meeting of the board of trustees on Sept. 1. 1829, it was voted to create the chair and elect him professor with a salary of $800, which was afterward raised to $1000, a full professor's salary. He was also appointed librarian for one year with a salary of $100. He held both of these positions until 1835, taught four modern languages and prepared his own text-books in French, Spanish and Italian. He began to contribute to the North American Review in April, 1831, articles on the origin and progress of the French, Spanish and Italian languages and literature and also original translations. On the establishment of the New England Magazine by Joseph T. Buckingham in 1831, he sent to the opening number the first of a series called "The Schoolmaster" which were scenes from his travels in France. They were the first sketches of his "Outre Mer." He married Mary Storer, she is commemorated in Longfellow' "Footsteps of Angels" as
          "the Being Beauteous
          Who unto my youth was given
          More than all things else to love me,
          And is now a saint in heaven."
They began housekeeping on Federal street, Brunswick, Maine, where Professor Longfellow attended his classes and continued his literary work. In 1833 he published his first book "Coplas de Don Jorge Manrique," a translation from the Spanish, with an original essay. His second book, "Outre-Mer," was written somewhat after the style of Irving's "Sketch-Book" which had been Longfellow's favorite book when a boy. In December, 1834, he received a letter from President Josiah Quincy, offering him the professorship of modern languages at Harvard college, Professor Ticknor, who was about to resign his chair, having recommended him as his successor. When Longfellow accepted, it was suggested that he visit Europe for the purpose of perfecting himself in the German and Scandinavian tongues and he resigned from Bowdoin and in April, 1835, set sail with his wife for England, and thence, a few weeks later, went to Norway and Sweden. Late in the autumn he settled in Rotterdam, Holland, where his wife and child died Nov. 29, 1835. He passed the winter of 1835-36 in Heidelberg, Germany, where he met Bryant and his family. The spring and summer of 1836 were spent chiefly in Switzerland and the Tyrol, and at Interlachen he met Frances Appleton, who afterward became his wife. He reached home in November, 1836, and in December was established as Smith professor of French and Spanish languages and literatures and belles-lettres at Harvard. He continued his contributions to the periodicals, and in 1839 published "Hyperion: a Romance" which was inspired by Miss Appleton, who is pictured therein as "Mary Ashburton." In March, 1837, Nathaniel Hawthorne, a classmate of Longfellow's at Bowdoin, sent to Longfellow his "Twice-told Tales" which he noticed in the North American Review of July, 1837, and was thus among the first to recognize Hawthorne's genius. In this year he also formed a strong and lasting friendship with Cornelius C. Felton, George S. Hilliard, Henry R. Cleveland and Charles Sumner. They called themselves the "Five of Clubs" and earned for themselves the sobriquet of the "Mutual Admiration Society." "The Psalm of Life" appeared anonymously in The Knickerbocker Magazine, in 1838, and was republished in Longfellow's first volume of poems, "The Voices of the Night," in 1839. He became a contributor to Graham's Magazine in 1841. In the spring of 1842 he obtained a six months' leave of absence and made a third visit to Europe. He was entertained in London for two weeks by Charles Dickens, and at Marienberg-on-the-Rhine, where he spent the summer, He made the acquaintance of the German poet Freiligrath, which ripened into friendship and lasted until the latter's death. On his marriage to Frances, as a wedding gift Mr. Appleton presented to them Caigie House and estate, where the poet had lived since 1837. The subject of "Evangeline, a Tale of Acadia" (1847), was a gift from Hawthorne to Longfellow. This is considered Longfellow's representative poem and was his favorite among Iris own writings. Holmes likened it to some "exquisite symphony." he resigned his chair at Harvard in 1854, and at his suggestion James Russell Lowell was elected to fill the vacancy. "Hiawatha; an Indian Edda," which appeared in 1855, is said to be his most genuine addition to American literature, and has been translated into nearly all of the modern languages and into Latin. The poem won immediate recognition in Europe, and within four weeks of its publication ten thousand copies had been sold. When the Atlantic Monthly was established in 1857 Longfellow became a contributor. A sad accident befell Mrs. Longfellow on the afternoon of Tuesday, July 9, 1861. A bit of burning wax from which she was making seals for her children, fell on her dress and she was immediately enveloped in flames and died on the following day. Her husband in trying to smother the flames received serious injuries himself. The shock of her death sadly affected the poet, who once remarked to a friend "I was too happy. I might fancy the gods envied me, if I could fancy heathen gods." Mrs. Longfellow left five children: Charles Appleton, a lieutenant in the 1st Massachusetts cavalry during the civil war; Ernest Wadsworth, the artist (q.v.), and three daughters, Alice, Edith and Annie, who were the" blye-eyed banditti" of his "Children's Hour." the poet had commenced a translation of Dante's "The Divine Comedy" during the early years of his Harvard professorship, and after his wife's death found solace in the completion of the work. This was regarded by many critics as the best translation in the English language. He visited Europe for the fourth time in 1868, and while in England had an interview with Queen Victoria at Windsor Castle on July 4, 1868, and was entertained by Tennyson at the Isle of Wight. He spent the winter and spring of 1868-69 in Italy, again made a brief stay in England and returned to his home in Cambridge in August, 1869. For "The Hanging of the Crane," which first appeared in the New York Ledger in 1874. Longfellow received $4000. In 1875, with the assistance of John Owen, Mr. Longfellow began to edit a collection of poems, to which was given the title "Poems of Places" (1876-79), and after Senator Sumner's death he assisted in editing the remaining six volumes of the fifteen containing "The Works of Charles Sumner." On Feb. 27, 1879, the occasion of the poet's seventy-second birthday, the children of Cambridge presented him with an armchair constructed from the wood of the old chestnut tree, made famous by his poem "The Village Blacksmith." he responded to this gift in that tender and touching poem, entitled "From My Arm-chair." His seventy-fifth birthday was generally celebrated all over the United States, especially by the school children. Charles Kingsley said of Longfellow: "His face was the mirror of his harmonious and lovely mind—I do not think I ever saw a finer human face." He has been called the "American poet laureate." He was an honorary member of the Historical and Geographical society of Brazil, a corresponding member of the Imperial Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, and of the Royal Academy of Spain; a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the Massachusetts Historical society. A bust to his memory was placed in the poets' corner at Westminster Abbey in March, 1884, he being the first and up to 1901 the only American author to be so honored. Longfellow Park was given to Cambridge by his children, and a monument to his memory was erected in Portland, Maine. His name was one of the twenty-three in "Class A, Authors and Editors" submitted in October, 1900, for a place in the Hall of Fame for Great Americans, New York university, and received eighty-five out of ninety-seven possible votes, Emerson alone in the class exceeding with eighty-seven votes, Irving and Hawthorne receiving eighty-three and seventy-three votes respectively, and the four names were selected. He received the degree of LL.D. from Harvard in 1859, from Cambridge, England, in 1868, and from Bowdoin in 1874; and that of D.C.L. from Oxford, England, in 1869. The following is a list of the principal works of Longfellow: Coplas de Don Jorge Manrique (1833); Outre-Mer (1835); Hyperion (1839); Voices of the Night (1839); Ballads and Other Poems (1841); Poems on Slavery (1842); Spanish Student (1843); Poets and Poetry of Europe (1845); Belfry of Bruges (1846); Evangeline (1847); Kavanagh (1849); Seaside and the Fireside (1850); Golden Legend (1851); Hiawatha (1855); Miles Standish (1858); Tales of a Wayside Inn (1863); Flower-de-Luce (1867); Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri (1867-70); New England Tragedies (1868); Divine Tragedy (1871); Three Books of Song (1872); Christus (1872); Aftermath (1873); Hanging of the Crane (1874); Masque of Pandora (1875); Kéramos (1878); Ultima Thule (1880); In the Harbor (part II. of Ultima Thule 1883); Michael Angelo (1884). Biographies of Longfellow have been written by Thomas Davidson (1882); Francis H. Underwood (1882); W. Sloane Kennedy (1882); George Lowell Austin (1883); Samuel Longfellow (1885); Eric S. Robertson (London, 1887), and others.5 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow died on 24 March 1882 in at his home, Cambridge, Massachusetts, at the age of 75 of peritonitis and at the funeral services were read verses from "Hiawatha" beginning: "He is dead, the sweet musician." Fields, Holmes, Emerson and Whittier were among the mourners.5

Child of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Mary Storer Potter

Children of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Frances Elizabeth Appleton

Citations

  1. [S4] Sandra MacLean Clunies, Clunies files.
  2. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.
  3. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 234.
  4. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 235.
  5. [S18] Various editors, Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans, Vol. 7, p. 11.

Jonathan Longfellow1

M, b. 27 December 1775, d. 11 January 1861
     Jonathan Longfellow was born on 27 December 1775.1 He was the son of Nathan Longfellow and Taphenes Huntly.1 Jonathan Longfellow married Margaret (Unknown) widow Longfellow.1 Jonathan Longfellow died on 11 January 1861 at the age of 85.1

Citations

  1. [S193] Anon, Genealogy of the Longfellow family, p. 7.

Judge Jonathan Longfellow1

M, b. 23 May 1714, d. 1774
     Judge Jonathan Longfellow was born on 23 May 1714 in Hampton Falls.2 He was the son of Capt. Nathan Longfellow and Mary Green.1 Judge Jonathan Longfellow married Mercy Clark, daughter of Henry Clark and Elizabeth Greenleaf, in 1731.1 Judge Jonathan Longfellow died in 1774 in Machias, Maine.2

Child of Judge Jonathan Longfellow and Mercy Clark

Citations

  1. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 7 p. 514.
  2. [S553] Anon [John Scales?], Three generations, p. 34.

Katy or Catherine Longfellow1

F, b. 20 July 1786, d. 5 July 1804
     Katy or Catherine Longfellow was born on 20 July 1786 in Gorham.1 She was the daughter of Hon. Stephen Longfellow and Patience Young.1 Katy or Catherine Longfellow died on 5 July 1804 at the age of 17.1 She was buried in Gorham, g.s.1

Citations

  1. [S106] Maine Families in 1790, Vol. 1 p. 189.

Mary Longfellow1

F
     Mary Longfellow was the daughter of Hon. Stephen Longfellow and Zilpah Wadsworth.1 Mary Longfellow married James Greenleaf, son of Hon. Simon Greenleaf and Hannah Kingman.1

Citations

  1. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 234.

Nathan Longfellow1

M, b. 17 January 1735, d. 19 November 1736
     Nathan Longfellow was born on 17 January 1735.2 He was the son of Lt. Stephen Longfellow and Abigail Thompson.1 Nathan Longfellow died on 19 November 1736 at the age of 1.1,2

Citations

  1. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 231.
  2. [S193] Anon, Genealogy of the Longfellow family, p. 6.

Nathan Longfellow1

M, b. 1 September 1744, d. 8 January 1828
     Nathan Longfellow was born on 1 September 1744.1 He was the son of William Longfellow and Hepsibah Plummer.1 Nathan Longfellow married Taphenes Huntly.1 Nathan Longfellow died on 8 January 1828 at the age of 83.1

Children of Nathan Longfellow and Taphenes Huntly

Citations

  1. [S193] Anon, Genealogy of the Longfellow family, p. 6.
  2. [S193] Anon, Genealogy of the Longfellow family, p. 7.

Capt. Nathan Longfellow1,2

M, b. 5 February 1690, d. 15 February 1730/31
     Of Hampton Falls.3 Capt. Nathan Longfellow was born on 5 February 1690.3 He was the son of Ensign William Longfellow and Anne Sewall.1 Capt. Nathan Longfellow married Mary Green on 28 May 1713.1,3 He was a saddler by trade and had a large family who settled in the northern part of New Hampshire and Machias, Maine.4 Capt. Nathan Longfellow died on 15 February 1730/31 at the age of 41.3

Child of Capt. Nathan Longfellow and Mary Green

Citations

  1. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 231.
  2. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 7 p. 514.
  3. [S25] Samuel Sewall, Diary of Samuel Sewall (1973 ed.), p. 1083.
  4. [S193] Anon, Genealogy of the Longfellow family, p. 4.

Lt. Samel Longfellow1

M, b. 30 July 1789, d. 13 October 1818
     Lt. Samel Longfellow was born on 30 July 1789 in Gorham.1 He was the son of Hon. Stephen Longfellow and Patience Young.1 Lt. Samel Longfellow married Sophia Storey on 28 May 1816 in Pepperellborough.1 Lt. Samel Longfellow died on 13 October 1818 in Gorham at the age of 29.1

Citations

  1. [S106] Maine Families in 1790, Vol. 1 p. 189.

Samuel Longfellow1

M, b. 4 March 1725, d. 4 August 1800
     Samuel Longfellow was born on 4 March 1725.2 He was the son of Lt. Stephen Longfellow and Abigail Thompson.1 Samuel Longfellow died on 4 August 1800 at the age of 75.2

Citations

  1. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 231.
  2. [S193] Anon, Genealogy of the Longfellow family, p. 5.

Samuel Longfellow1

M
     Samuel Longfellow was the son of Stephen Longfellow and Tabitha Bragdon.1 Samuel Longfellow died s.n.p.1

Citations

  1. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 232.

Samuel Longfellow1

M, b. 8 July 1758
     Samuel Longfellow was born on 8 July 1758.1 He was the son of William Longfellow and Hepsibah Plummer.1

Citations

  1. [S193] Anon, Genealogy of the Longfellow family, p. 7.

Rev. Samuel Longfellow1

M, b. 18 June 1819, d. 3 October 1892
     Rev. Samuel Longfellow was born on 18 June 1819 in Portland, Maine.1 He was the son of Hon. Stephen Longfellow and Zilpah Wadsworth.1 Rev. Samuel Longfellow graduated in 1839 from Harvard and 1846 Divinity School.1 Between 1853 and 1860 he was a Unitarian Minister at Brooklyn. He died on 3 October 1892 at the age of 73.1

Citations

  1. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.

Sarah Longfellow1

F, b. 8 January 1721, d. 17 July 1803
     Sarah Longfellow was born on 8 January 1721.2 She was the daughter of Lt. Stephen Longfellow and Abigail Thompson.1 Sarah Longfellow died on 17 July 1803 at the age of 82.2

Citations

  1. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 231.
  2. [S193] Anon, Genealogy of the Longfellow family, p. 5.

Sarah Longfellow1

F, b. 1737, d. 1811
     Sarah Longfellow was born in 1737.1 She was the daughter of Judge Jonathan Longfellow and Mercy Clark.1 Sarah Longfellow married Gen. Joseph Cilley in 1756.1 Sarah Longfellow died in 1811.1

Child of Sarah Longfellow and Gen. Joseph Cilley

Citations

  1. [S189] Frederick A. Virkus, Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 7 p. 514.

Stephen Longfellow

M, b. 7 February 1723, d. 1 May 1790
     Stephen Longfellow was born on 7 February 1723 in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts.1,2 He was the son of Lt. Stephen Longfellow and Abigail Thompson. Stephen Longfellow graduated in 1742 from Harvard.1 He married Tabitha Bragdon, daughter of Samuel Bragdon and Tabitha Bankes, on 19 October 1749 in Falmouth, Maine.3,2 Stephen Longfellow was appointed in 1760, Clerk of the Court at Portland, Maine.4 He died on 1 May 1790 in Gorham, Maine, at the age of 67.3

Children of Stephen Longfellow and Tabitha Bragdon

Citations

  1. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 231.
  2. [S56] J.Y.W. Lloyd, History of he Lords Marcher.
  3. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 232.
  4. [S63] John Farmer, Genealogical register, Longfellow.

Stephen Longfellow1

M
     Stephen Longfellow was the son of Hon. Stephen Longfellow and Zilpah Wadsworth.2 Stephen Longfellow was educated in 1821 at Bowdoin College.1 He married Marianne Preble, daughter of Hon. William Pitt Preble and Nancy Gale Tucker.1

Child of Stephen Longfellow and Marianne Preble

Citations

  1. [S24] Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 234.
  2. [S5] William Darcy McKeough, McKeough Family Tree.